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Custom Art is Helping High End Homeowners to Paint a Clearer Picture

Custom Art is Helping High End Homeowners to Paint a Clearer Picture

Wall Street Journal

BY CHRISTINA POLETTO | ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON MAY 28, 2020 | THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Real-estate agents are commissioning original artwork to make luxury property listings "stand out in a crouded sea of sameness"

..."Custom art can be a great tool to attract buyers as it adds to the allure of originality and exclusivity," said Mr. Saft.

 

George Dunbar  "Contemporary Art In An Antique City: Looking Back At The Orleans Gallery"

George Dunbar "Contemporary Art In An Antique City: Looking Back At The Orleans Gallery"

October 19, 2018

This NOLA Life Stories interview was conducted by Mark Cave for The Historic New Orleans Collection and produced for WWNO by Sarah Holtz.

"Review: Raine Bedsole explores spirit Vessels in 'Passage' The Gambit

"Review: Raine Bedsole explores spirit Vessels in 'Passage' The Gambit

BY D. ERIC BOOKHARDT 

"Review: Sibylle Peretti:It Was Such A Beautiful Promise"

"Review: Sibylle Peretti:It Was Such A Beautiful Promise"


Enigmatic Narratives

By, Kathy Rodriguez

 

 

"Review: José-María Cundín The Supreme Leader and Other Ponderables"

"Review: José-María Cundín The Supreme Leader and Other Ponderables"

October 17th, 2017

By, Eric Bookhardt via BestofNewOrleans.com

What's with all those weirdly wavy Spanish paintings? Rounded forms can be alluring, but only Spanish artists have made them as immortal as Picasso's curvy, convoluted concoctions or Joan Miro's mysterious blobby squiggles — and only Fernando Botero could get away with a tubby, chubby Christ in crucifixion scenes.

"Review: Doyle Gertjejansen: Faith and Reason II" Gambit

"Review: Doyle Gertjejansen: Faith and Reason II" Gambit

August 14, 2017

By, Eric Bookhardt

"A Modern Art Pioneer Down in New Orleans:An 89-year-old maverick reflects on the life and community he built down South," The New York Times, T Magazine

"A Modern Art Pioneer Down in New Orleans:An 89-year-old maverick reflects on the life and community he built down South," The New York Times, T Magazine

June 5th, 2017

by, Sara Ruffin Costello

photo credit: Paul Costello

"Review: Sibylle Peretti's It Was A Beautiful Promise at Callan Contemporary" Gambit

"Review: Sibylle Peretti's It Was A Beautiful Promise at Callan Contemporary" Gambit

June 4th, 2017

by, Eric Bookhardt

"Review: George Dunbar: Beyond Style," The New Orleans Art Review

"Review: George Dunbar: Beyond Style," The New Orleans Art Review

by Terrington Calas

GEORGE DUNBAR, “Elements of Chance” A Retrospective

The New Orleans Museum of Art

New Orleans, LA

Press Release: George Dunbar 'Palladium'

Press Release: George Dunbar 'Palladium'

by Richard Speer

In Palladium, his fourth solo exhibition at Callan Contemporary, critically acclaimed artist George Dunbar (b. 1927) explores the beauty of one of the world’s most alluring metals.  Dunbar has long used palladium leaf, a distilled form of platinum, to impart a unique luster and a sense of character and history in his powerfully dynamic compositions. The mixed-media paintings and sculptures in the exhibition, all of which incorporate palladium, range from 1999 to the present and encompass the artist’s work in relief, hard-edge abstraction, and figuration.

 

 

"Spaces for the Mind and Eye," by Miranda McClintic

The paintings of James Kennedy are intriguing, dignified, and beautifully crafted. Formal but never predicable, their subject is space. With training in modern art, dance, and architectural design, he has created a personal language of form and color. Kennedy’s approach is both deliberate and intuitive. He experiments with painting materials, choreographs relationships among eccentric hard-edged shapes, and builds diagrams of incised lines and small black dots to achieve complex surface and spatial interactions.

"Shawne Major: Colossal Collage," Surface Design Journal

"Shawne Major: Colossal Collage," Surface Design Journal

Winter 2014

by Nick Stillman

"Review: Qualia: Geometric Paintings by James Flynn," Gambit

"Review: Qualia: Geometric Paintings by James Flynn," Gambit

June 23, 2014

By D. Eric Bookhardt on a new show at Callan Contemporary.

"Review: I Search in Snow," Gambit

"Review: I Search in Snow," Gambit

April 14, 2014

D. Eric Bookhardt on new sculpture by Sibylle Peretti at Callan Contemporary.

"Review: Norah Lovell at Callan Contemporary," Pelican Bomb

"Review: Norah Lovell at Callan Contemporary," Pelican Bomb

January 28, 2014

By Taylor Murrow

Norah Lovell’s works live in the space behind our eyelids, the flashes of imagery that skip the synapses of our brains while we dream. Like the compositions of Hieronymus Bosch, these microcosms are compact puzzles teeming with animals, plant life, mythological creatures, playing card symbols, and more. It’s overwhelming at first to attempt to unpack the many narratives that seem to be lurking within. Each work feels like a fairytale whirring through a blender.

In her Untwinned Horn series, Lovell uses tenth-century riddle poems as springboards, offering a pictorial interpretation of the original poems, creating new riddles of their own. In the Master of Hounds series, multiple stories—such as a foxhunt and a journey through a labyrinth—are woven together through graphic tiles and baroque patterning. The tendrils of a creeping vine bisect the face of a grimacing hare before flowing into a brick wall. What Lovell accomplishes largely in fleshy pinks, stark black, and white is mesmerizing and confusing. It’s a trip you want to take and could take countless times with different results.

"Review: Beneath the Shades and Amid the Strikes," Gambit

"Review: Beneath the Shades and Amid the Strikes," Gambit

January 14th, 2014

D. Eric Bookhardt on new paintings by Norah Lovell and Peter Barnitz

Norah Lovell's colorfully intricate compositions can be seductive yet elusive. Like fragments of dreams that linger upon waking, they draw us in with elements of beauty, familiarity and intrigue while defying easy interpretation. Rendered in pencil and gouache, these small (12 inches by 16 inches) but very precise compositions hint at the shadowy baroque elegance of Boccaccio's Decameron tales, or the old Venetian carnivals where the beautiful and the sinister, darkness and light, flickered kaleidoscopically. Untwinned Horn: Capillus (pictured) is a dreamy pastiche of hearts and candelabra where fairy tale princesses share space with rollicking cats, florid wallpaper and ghostly shadows in an imagistic vortex that draws you in then makes you wonder where you are and how you got there. Similarly, Master of Hounds reads like a graphic acid flashback to a realm of historical fiction reminiscent of Emily Bronte. Here Lovell takes us on an elegantly executed magical mystery tour where high culture and street carnivals find common ground in the far recesses of the imagination.

 

 

The Natural World

The Natural World

June 2013

By: Robert K. Carsten

"Non-present Presence: Eva Hild's Evocative Sculptures Fill Space with meaning and Poeticism," Art New Orleans

"Non-present Presence: Eva Hild's Evocative Sculptures Fill Space with meaning and Poeticism," Art New Orleans

Fall 2011

The work of a physical therapist and the work of an artist would seem to have little overlap, but for sculptor Eva Hild there are direct and indirect lines between the two. Back in the 1990s, she worked full-time as a physical therapist in Gothenburg, Sweden. Later, she switched to part-time duties as she worked her way through art school...

"Review: Sibylle Peretti and Mixed Media Works," Gambit

"Review: Sibylle Peretti and Mixed Media Works," Gambit

November 2, 2009

By D. Eric Bookhardt

"Human Nature: A Conversation with Sibylle Peretti," Artvoices

"Human Nature: A Conversation with Sibylle Peretti," Artvoices

October 2009

By Chris Herbeck

"Steven Paul Day and Sibylle Peretti," Wheaton Arts and Cultural Center

March 4, 2008

By Robin Rice

"Art in Review: Eva Hild: In Between," New York Times

"Art in Review: Eva Hild: In Between," New York Times

November 9, 2007

By Roberta Smith

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